Skip to content

Stuart Hall Encoding Decoding Essay Scholarships

Stuart Hall Encoding And Decoding

Stuart Hall

Four intellectuals established Cultural Studies, namely, Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams, E.P. Thompson, and Stuart Hall. Hall (b. 1932) has had the lion's share of publicity. Scholars working in this tradition often take their cue from his articles.

Hall tells us that he grew up in Jamaica, the "blackest son" (in his words) of a middle-class, conservative family; from an early age, Hall says, he rejected his father's attempt to assimilate into white, English-speaking society (his father worked his way up through the United Fruit Company). In 1951, he won a scholarship to Oxford (he was a Rhodes scholar)--and (as they say) the rest is history. As a student at Oxford, he sensed that his color as well as his economic status affected the way people related to him. At this time, he social life centred on a circle of West Indian students. He subsequently won (in 1954) a scholarship to pursue post-graduate studies. At this time, he aligned himself with the emerging New Left (a group opposed to Stalinism and British imperialism). During the period 1957-61, he taught in secondary school in Brixton, London, and edited the Universities and Left Review, and during the period 1961-64 he taught film and media studies at Chelsea College, London. During the period 1964-79, he taught at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS), Birmingham. Over the years, Paul Corrigan, John Fiske, Dick Hebdige, Angela McRobbie, David Morley, and Paul Willis have worked at the Centre. Hall has always combined activism and theorizing. He says that he has always been within "shouting distance of Marx." For example, during the 1950s, he was--along with Raymond Williams--a leading light of the New Left. For ten years or so he rejected Marxist, and then for about ten years he embraced Marxism. Hall argued that cultural studies must hold theoretical and political questions in permanent tension--so that they can irritate one another. During the 1980s, Hall wrote about "Marxism without guarantees." Despite his ambiguous relationship with Marxism, he never accepted the view that the class struggle explains/determines everything. Nevertheless, he insists that cultural studies can have a practical impact on reality. He challenges intellectuals by asking: "What effect are you having on the world?" Since 1979, Hall has been professor of sociology at the Open University, the distance-learning institution.

During the late 1970s, Hall produced at least two papers on the COMS paradigm he called "encoding/decoding," in which he builds on the work of Roland Barthes. What follows is a synthesis of two of these papers, offered in the interest of capturing the nuances he gave his presentations. The numbers in brackets identify the two papers (the bibliographic details are provided at the end).

ENCODING AND DECODING

1. introduction

2. research project

research question

3. approach taken

theoretical framework

analytical technique

4. findings

...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Marxist Media Theory. Essay

4310 words - 17 pages Marxist Media TheoryDaniel Chandler"XIntroduction"XBase and superstructure"XMedia as means of production"XIdeology"XMedia as amplifiers"XThe constitution of the subject"XDifferences within Marxism"XThe Frankfurt School"XAlthusser"XGramsci and hegemony"XStuart Hall"XLimitations...

Significance of the Elements of the Communication Process and Misinterpretation

3313 words - 13 pages Several elements compose the communication process, most models include the sender along with encoding, transmission, medium or channel, reception or receiver, decoding, and feedback (Peak, 2007, p.32).ELEMENTSSENDER is one of the two or more people are always involved in communication, (Erven).Significance The lack of communication is the cause of personal and world strife.The process starts with a sender or communicator...

Culture and Communication

1276 words - 5 pages Culture and Communication Introduction In The Silent Language, Edward Hall’s (1959) seminal examination of non-verbal communication, it is ambiguous asserted that “culture is communication and communication is culture,” (217). Though this statement is obviously lacks for broad explanatory power, Hall nevertheless aptly articulates the crucial roles that culture plays in communication research. From its role in theories of communication...

Convolutional Coding

1374 words - 5 pages Overview: Convolutional codes(CC) are a very fast a unique method of encoding a message. They differ from other codes we have discussed in class, because most codes send a message and multiple parity check digits. These codes include but are not limited to, Hamming Codes, Parity Check codes, and Reed-Solomon codes and many others. Instead of transmitting the message and parity bits, Convolutional codes only transmit parity bits. This allows for...

Communication Process

809 words - 3 pages Communication Process Introduction Communication establishes relationships and makes organizing possible. Every message has a purpose or objective. The sender intends -- whether consciously or unconsciously -- to accomplish something by communicating. In organizational contexts, messages typically have a definite objective: to motivate, to inform, to teach, to persuade, to entertain, or to inspire. This definite purpose is, in fact, one...

Communication Process

1168 words - 5 pages Communication Process Paper Page 1Communication Process PaperMGT 33122 December 2003Communication Process Paper Page 2AbstractCommunication is an immeasurable force in our life. The process that we choose to communicate by with others will determine how people interact with us, how we interpret information, if we're knowledgeable, if we're trusted, respected, or even how people perceive our...

Symbolic Interaction Theory

973 words - 4 pages The discussion in this paper outlines the significance of symbolic interaction theory as it can be helpful to analyze, critique, and understand interpersonal communication. The meanings assigned through symbols can be altered through an interpretive process which is directly related with the communication process. This interpretive process, therefore, highlights the importance of communication process for interaction with society. Symbolic...

Cross cultural management

2423 words - 10 pages IntroductionCommunication is the process which people can share their meaning or transmitting message to each other through several media such as words, behavior, or material artifacts. In the case given to us, there are a few examples to describe kinds of communication across cultures and some negotiation blunders. Different countries have their own kinds of culture and it behooves those people doing the business in a country that is foreign...

Non-Verbal Communication and Inter-Cultural Communication

1027 words - 4 pages Nonverbal communication is defined as the approach of conveying information and data by using speech, visuals, signs , behavior etc. Approximately 65% of the communication takes place through nonverbal attributes. Generally communication takes place with three steps. FIRST Is the thought or idea that comes in the mind of the sender. SECOND is the encoding which means sending message to the receiver in a particular gesture or sign or via a...

The Communication Process

983 words - 4 pages The Communication Process The communication process is used in every kind of relationship. It could be in a friendship, an acquaintance, a significant other, a family, and many more. I found out these processes can be harder than you think three years ago. My father got remarried and I was forced to become up close and personal with complete strangers, my step family. The communication process language in my step family describes the...

Effective Communication: Critical to the Success of the Manager and the Organization

1213 words - 5 pages Communication can be referred to as, the sending information through a channel to the receiver and the receiver understanding the meaning of the information. Effective communication is very important to any organization and without it the organization will not function effectively. Communication has four functions, they are control, motivation information and emotional expression. Communication can be broken down into two groups, interpersonal...

Stuart Hall - Encoding and Decoding Essay examples

3111 Words13 Pages

Stuart Hall

Four intellectuals established Cultural Studies, namely, Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams, E.P. Thompson, and Stuart Hall. Hall (b. 1932) has had the lion's share of publicity. Scholars working in this tradition often take their cue from his articles.

Hall tells us that he grew up in Jamaica, the "blackest son" (in his words) of a middle-class, conservative family; from an early age, Hall says, he rejected his father's attempt to assimilate into white, English-speaking society (his father worked his way up through the United Fruit Company). In 1951, he won a scholarship to Oxford (he was a Rhodes scholar)--and (as they say) the rest is history. As a student at Oxford, he sensed that his color as well as his economic…show more content…

During the 1980s, Hall wrote about "Marxism without guarantees." Despite his ambiguous relationship with Marxism, he never accepted the view that the class struggle explains/determines everything. Nevertheless, he insists that cultural studies can have a practical impact on reality. He challenges intellectuals by asking: "What effect are you having on the world?" Since 1979, Hall has been professor of sociology at the Open University, the distance-learning institution.

During the late 1970s, Hall produced at least two papers on the COMS paradigm he called "encoding/decoding," in which he builds on the work of Roland Barthes. What follows is a synthesis of two of these papers, offered in the interest of capturing the nuances he gave his presentations. The numbers in brackets identify the two papers (the bibliographic details are provided at the end).

ENCODING AND DECODING

1. introduction

2. research project

research question

3. approach taken

theoretical framework

analytical technique

4. findings

5. works cited

I. Introduction

Traditionally, mass-communication theorists and researchers have conceptualized the process of communication in terms of a circuit: production, distribution, and consumption (p. 51). Since the late 1940s, they have represented communication as a linear process: SENDER-MESSAGE-RECEIVER. I propose to re-think this model,

Show More